Thursday, March 12, 2020

Egyptian Pyramids Essays - Giza Plateau, Saqqara, Free Essays

Egyptian Pyramids Essays - Giza Plateau, Saqqara, Free Essays Egyptian Pyramids When most people mention Ancient Egypt the first thing that comes to mind is the Pyramids. To construct such monuments required a mastery of art, architecture and social organization that few cultures would ever rival. The pyramids are said to have built Egypt by being the force that knit together the kingdom's economy. Their creations were so subeztial, that the sight of these vast pyramids would take your breath away. Today, the valley of the Nile has an open air museum so people can witness these grand monuments. Obsessed with the afterlife, Egypt's rulers of 4,500 years ago glorified themselves in stone, thereby laying the foundation of the first great nation-state. A Pyramid is an enormous machine that helps the king go through the wall of the dead, achieve resurrection and live forever in the happiness of the gods. The start of the Old Kingdom is said to be the building of the Djoser's monument. The construction of Step Pyramid of Pharaoh Djoser began around 2630 B.C. and was designed to awe the ancient Egyptians, to impress them with their rule's godlike strength. It was the world's first great construction project; indeed, it was the world's largest building. Djoser, the second king of the 3rd dynasty, hired an architect called Imhoptep who for the first time constructed a tomb completely of stone. Imhoptep is considered the preeminent genius of the Old Kingdom. He assembled one workforce to quarry limestone at the cliff of Tura, across the Nile, another to haul the stone to the site where master carvers shaped each block and put it in place. The Step Pyramid is a terraced structure rising in six unequal stages to a height of 60 meters, its base measuring 120 meters by 108 meters. The substructure has a system of underground corridors and rooms. Its main feature being a central shaft 25 meters deep and 8 meters wide. The step pyramid rises within a vast walled court 544 meters long and 277 meters wide, in which are the remnants of several stone edifices built to supply the wants of the king in the here after. Towering limestone columns were shaped to mimic the sway and droop of leafy plants. Immovable doors hung on great carved hinges. Facades called false doors through which the pharaoh's ka, or vital force, was presumed to pass, lay recessed within walls. The interiors of dummy temples were packed with rubble. Everything about the place bespoke illusion. The Step Pyramid was a ladder. Not a symbol of a ladder but an actual one, by which the soul of a dead ruler might climb to the sky, joining the gods in immortality. No one knows why the Egyptians created this fantastic scene, but some archaeologists speculate that there was an Old Kingdom belief that a work of art, a building, had power and utility in the afterlife in direct proportion to its uselessness in the real world. In this view, each false door, each dummy temple worked in the afterlife precisely because it could not function in this one. On the north side of the pyramid is a small stone cubicle, with a pair of tiny holes in its facade. When you look through these holes, you see two eyes retuning your stare, the blank gaze of a life size statue of Djoser sitting on the throne. The holes are there for the pharaoh to look out perhaps at the stars in the northern sky called the Imperishables because they never set. Many believe that the building of Djoser's pyramid complex, which was accomplished by hundreds of workers from across the land, served to join those provinces into the world's first nation-state. During the Old Kingdom, which began around 2700 B.C. and lasted some 550 years, each pharaoh after Djoser marshaled a vast portion of his country's manpower and wealth to build his own tomb and ensure his immortality. To build such outezding monuments required a preciseness of architecture, and years of endless labor from so many Egyptians. The kingdom developed a funerary tradition around the worship of their divine pharaohs, both living and dead. Every aspect of life was affected. The Egyptians dug a network of canals

Tuesday, February 25, 2020

Middle east Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 750 words - 1

Middle east - Essay Example He was a prominent composer of the Classical period and he played an important part in developing chamber music, like the piano trio and he is also known as the Father of Symphony. A prominent characteristic of Haydn’s music is the development of the sonata form and simple musical motifs, which he derived from large structures. Haydn was more interested in monothematic exposition, in which the music is dominant is similar to the theme that is presented in the opening. Unlike other composers, there was humor found in Haydn’s compositions like the Surprise Symphony; his compositions were particularly developed for the delight of a prince. His compositions also reflected his own personality, which was healthy and well-balanced. The role of Haydn was important, because he proved to be an example for other composers like Beethoven. He is known for his contributions towards Opera and chamber music; he made 42 compositions fro opera, 29 compositions for oratorios, 120 compositions for cantatas and many compositions for chamber music. The most popular piece produced by Handel is Messiah, which is known in contemporary music as Hallelujah; it is a composition of choral music and is mostly sung at Christmas times. Handel also composed Music for the Royal Fireworks, which was attended by 12,000 people, when it was first performed. The transition piece, which encouraged Handel to move from Italian to English, was his choral work called Saul. Handel did a lot of experimenting in this composition with his trombones, carillon and military kettledrums. Johann Sebastian Bach was a skilled German composer and musician, who changed the German styles by introducing counterpoint, harmony and motives in his compositions. His prominent works included as an organist; he was known for composing organ works like preludes and fantasias. However, his works involving

Sunday, February 9, 2020

Alternative Dispute Resolution Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 3750 words

Alternative Dispute Resolution - Essay Example Anyway, there is no harm in so doing. Mediation is actually a class or a form of an alternative dispute resolution process.2 ADR therefore is the generic term. Arbitration, however, has a different meaning. We have to take notice of the variance because the case to be analyzed is also criticized for not distinguishing arbitration from mediation, although that aspect will not be included in this paper. Stated in another way, ADR is a collective description of methods of resolving disputes otherwise than through the normal trial process. It is one of several ways to resolve disputes outside the ambit of the courts or to make an attempt to settle the case if possible. It is a procedure where the parties are therefore given a chance to amicably patch up their differences over a certain dispute. This has to be done in view of the prospect that those involved in a controversy may be able to mend things without going to the court for a full-blown trial. That is why it is considered an alternative solution, meaning that it will take the place of court proceedings if the parties agree. The most logical reason for ADR is to stop the further clogging of cases in tribunals or judicial bodies and agencies. Courts all over the world are confronted by the humongous predicament of so many pending matters for the action or resolution of the judge or panel of judges.3 Why must the courts be unclogged of cases The simple answer to this is to give more quality time to the judges in deciding or resolving suits and other incidents brought before them for judicial determination. If judges have limited time to so decide or resolve, they cannot prepare good and well-studied rulings compared to when they have ample opportunity. From a macro viewpoint, decisions which are crafted under deadline pressures will not serve the ends of justice. It will become a matter of what is haste is waste. If courts are to make good decisions in a loaded environment, what will happen is that the more recent filings will have to wait. Resultant of that will be the slow disposal or resolution of cases. Of course, public opinion frowns upon tardy decisions under the caveat that justice that is delayed is like justice that is denied. A grievance that is addressed but not expeditiously as normally expected is the same as if there was no redress at all.4 How can ADR help the unclogging of cases in the courts The more cases that are resolved in the ADR or mediation level, the lesser the cases that will be forwarded to the courts for hearing or trial. Such a situation will give more elbow room and latitude for the judges in dispensing their functions more efficiently, effectively and speedily. What are the advantages of ADR Firstly, in resorting to the mediation process, the parties save on time, money and efforts if they finally come to an amicable settlement. And secondly, the hostilities among the enemies are reduced if not totally removed and amity, if there was any, is restored once the compromise agreement shall have been concluded. Halsey, in its paragraph 15, citing the distinguished Lord Justice Brooke in the case of Dunnett v Railtrack, credited skilled mediators for having achieved satisfactory results in many cases than could have been achieved in court proceedings.5 Taken altogether, the attendant features surrounding the use of the ADR process indicate that it is for the public

Thursday, January 30, 2020

The Right Stuff by Tom Wolfe Essay Example for Free

The Right Stuff by Tom Wolfe Essay Tom Wolfe’s book, The Right Stuff, is about the lives of several pilots and astronauts who were involved in tests and experiments conducted by the United States after the Cold War. These experiments were in line with the space race between the United States and the then Union of Soviet Socialists Republic. These pilots were subjected to several experiments using experimental high speed aircrafts which are all rocket powered. Because of the complexity of the program, the pilots were tested and screened, and not all would pass these tests. The extensive nature of the research led to several effects on the pilots, their lives, and their families. In order to be chosen, or even to be just a part of the project, all of these people should possess one important aspect, which is known by many as â€Å"the right stuff†.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   Because of tough competition with the USSR, the United States chose only the best of the best for their experimental projects like the Project Mercury. Many people tried out for several experiments, but eventually, some of them would have to go home, as some would be able to continue with the experiments. It is a very extensive project, as well has a very demanding endeavor. There are a lot of requirements, and if the people involved fail to have one of these requirements, they will more or less be out of the project. As Tom Wolfe puts it, the people who can only continue would be those who possess the â€Å"right stuff† (Wolfe).   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   Tom Wolfe’s book defines the right stuff as having all the requirements and passing all the necessary tests in order to be a pilot or a spaceman. But that is not all; the right stuff would also have to include a strong heart, perseverance, and courage. It is through the mixture of all these trains that one would be able to attain the â€Å"right stuff† that the project calls for.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   One important aspect of the right stuff is about bravery. Being in the project, one must be brave in order to remain there. It is now just man vs. other man in competing for a spot in the project, but also man vs. himself. He is responsible to his actions as well as his decisions, which is why he needs to be firm enough not to be swayed away by his fears. Also, it is not bravery wherein you just have to risk your life, as anyone could easily do that. Instead, he should be willing to be literally a lab rat, wherein anything can happen to him. Afterwards, he should be able to keep his cool, as well as retain his reflexes and the experience in order to do it again for the next day, then again the next day, until the research calls for it to stop.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   There were various tests that these pilots and astronauts would have to undergo over and over again – an infinite set of mind and body exhausting activities that would really put anyone to their limits. The whole process is compared to a stepped pyramid or a ziggurat, wherein one has to move along the high and steep steps in order to go up. Through this way, that person can prove that as he goes up, he really does deserve to be one of those who were elected to do the job, because they were the right ones and because they had the right stuff to begin with. Everyone aims for the top, no matter how steep it is, though everyone gets only one chance to prove that they really have the right stuff. It was something that not all man can do, and the ones who do it are really the best.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   Tom Wolfe defines the right stuff as the culmination of every skill and every talent that a person has, provided that he passes every test that was set for him in order to qualify for the experiment. It is not pure brawns, or pure brains, but instead, it offers the best of everything. People possessing the right stuff really have to be good at many things, especially those which are greatly needed in the experiment. Works Cited: Wolfe, Tom. The Right Stuff. Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 1979.

Wednesday, January 22, 2020

Analysis of Shakespeares The Tempest - A Jungian Interpretation :: Shakespeare The Tempest

A Jungian Interpretation of the Tempest    Shakespeare’s Tempest lends itself to many different levels of meaning and interpretation. The play can be seen on a realistic plane as a tale of political power and social responsibility. It can be seen as allegory examining the growth of the human spirit. The Tempest investigates marriage, love, culture. It is symbolic of man’s rational higher instincts verses his animal natural tendencies. This is a play of repentance, power, revenge and fate that can also be seen as fantasy, dream, imagination, metaphor or magic. The Tempest should be allowed to represent many points of view, even those that the author was not consciously or unconsciously aware when he wrote it. One outlook does not invalidate the others. I propose to illustrate The Tempest as a play about what is occurring in the protagonist’s mind. To be more specific, it is the growth, maturing and individuation of Prospero. Shakespeare, in a sense of which he could not be conscious, was anticipating Freud and Jung. His servants, Ariel and Caliban, are the agents of synchronicity. By synchronicity, I mean meaningful coincidence; an acausal principle relating inner mind to the external world; a vehicle whereby the ego, if it is open, can glimpse the Self. In Jung’s terms, it is strongest when an emotional attachment exists and when there is an element of risk or death. When the subject is ready to learn, the unconscious mind can affect physical reality. By individuation, I mean, "becoming a single homogenous being †¦. Bec oming one’s own self †¦. Coming into selfhood." 1 To begin showing how this process takes place in Prospero, I would like to take issue with some traditional views of the character. Many critics see Prospero as completely in control of everything that takes place on his island. He is seen as all-knowing, having a perfect plan in place, often seen as calm, as good, as the main force of reason and logic and Man’s highest qualities. I do not dispute all of this. Prospero is an amazingly talented, wise, mature man in control of himself and his environment, but he is not perfect. This is a play showing growth and education in its characters, but most of all, the growth and education of Prospero himself. At the outset, he is a man in struggle, an embittered man, a vengeful tyrannical man; not God, unless it is the cruel anthropomorphic God of the early Old Testament. Analysis of Shakespeare's The Tempest - A Jungian Interpretation :: Shakespeare The Tempest A Jungian Interpretation of the Tempest    Shakespeare’s Tempest lends itself to many different levels of meaning and interpretation. The play can be seen on a realistic plane as a tale of political power and social responsibility. It can be seen as allegory examining the growth of the human spirit. The Tempest investigates marriage, love, culture. It is symbolic of man’s rational higher instincts verses his animal natural tendencies. This is a play of repentance, power, revenge and fate that can also be seen as fantasy, dream, imagination, metaphor or magic. The Tempest should be allowed to represent many points of view, even those that the author was not consciously or unconsciously aware when he wrote it. One outlook does not invalidate the others. I propose to illustrate The Tempest as a play about what is occurring in the protagonist’s mind. To be more specific, it is the growth, maturing and individuation of Prospero. Shakespeare, in a sense of which he could not be conscious, was anticipating Freud and Jung. His servants, Ariel and Caliban, are the agents of synchronicity. By synchronicity, I mean meaningful coincidence; an acausal principle relating inner mind to the external world; a vehicle whereby the ego, if it is open, can glimpse the Self. In Jung’s terms, it is strongest when an emotional attachment exists and when there is an element of risk or death. When the subject is ready to learn, the unconscious mind can affect physical reality. By individuation, I mean, "becoming a single homogenous being †¦. Bec oming one’s own self †¦. Coming into selfhood." 1 To begin showing how this process takes place in Prospero, I would like to take issue with some traditional views of the character. Many critics see Prospero as completely in control of everything that takes place on his island. He is seen as all-knowing, having a perfect plan in place, often seen as calm, as good, as the main force of reason and logic and Man’s highest qualities. I do not dispute all of this. Prospero is an amazingly talented, wise, mature man in control of himself and his environment, but he is not perfect. This is a play showing growth and education in its characters, but most of all, the growth and education of Prospero himself. At the outset, he is a man in struggle, an embittered man, a vengeful tyrannical man; not God, unless it is the cruel anthropomorphic God of the early Old Testament.

Monday, January 13, 2020

Different Ways in Which Ted Hughes Portrays Nature in His Poems

Compare the different ways in which Ted Hughes portrays nature in his poems as well as themes and ideas, you should consider the poems techniques? Ted Hughes is an English poet who was inspired by nature at his homeland in Yorkshire and wrote countless poems on this topic. I have studied several poems (Thistles, The thought fox, the jaguar, the horses, Hawk roosting, Pike, and Ghost Crabs). Within these poems I am going to compare the ways and techniques in which Ted Hughes portrays nature using poetic technique and language.Firstly Ted Hughes Uses personification to portray human senses and appearances, In ‘Thistles’ it says ‘fighting back over the same ground’ and ‘spike the summer air’ . These quotes from the poem create imagery as if the thistles have actually come alive and are fighting. This is used to make the poem interesting to the reader. Secondly in ‘Hawk Roosting’ it says ‘Nothing has changed since I began ‘. This poem is written from the hawks perspective . This is done so we as humans can see and relate to what the character and feelings of the hawk are.The hawks’ thoughts portray its natural instincts in the wild, it says ‘I kill where I please because it is all mine’. This shows that Hawks are ruthless killing machines and think that they are top of the picking order. This technique brings the character alive and creates more satisfaction for the reader. Ted Hughes uses anthropomorphism which is writing from an animal’s perspective. This is only used in one of the poems I have studied called ‘hawk roosting’ . This technique is brilliant at portraying the natural characteristics of an animal.In Ted Hughes’ poem ‘The Horses’ he uses pathetic fallacy to alter the image of the animals. Ted Hughes writes ‘steaming and glistening under the flow of light’, this makes the horses seem Godly and magical. This technique c reates imagery therefore making the moment in the poem special and unique. In many of Ted Hughes’ poems he makes nature seem superior to us. For example in ‘Pike’ he says ‘stunned by their own grandeur’ and ’past nightfall I dared not to cast’. These lines create the illusion that pike are dangerous large hunting animals that even humans should be scared of.But all they are is small fish that eat smaller fish at the bottom of a pond. But yet they seem worse in the poem due to the way Ted Hughes has described them. Ted Hughes makes nature seem superior to us in ‘The Horses’ when he says ’steaming and glistening ‘and ‘with draped manes’ these lines make the horses seem magical and much better than us as they seem so pure and seem to have so much strength especially in the line ‘their hung heads as patient as the horizons’. This makes them seem like majestic statues standing there boldly and purely.

Sunday, January 5, 2020

Jung Theory Personality Test I Ended Up With Being...

After taking the Jung theory personality test I ended up with being Extraverted, Intuitive, Feeling and Judging. After reviewing the definitions and results I do feel like this is pretty accurate. I will go into more detail as to how it is. At any time if anyone asked for any help whether it be as simple as holding a door I was glad to assist. Another example is when a close family member needs to borrow money to get through a rough time. I don’t go into great detail as to why they may need the money. I just let them borrow what they can and allow them to pay it back on their terms. I am always glad to help in any way I can to the best of my ability. I also feel like seeing the bigger picture fits well into my personality. Although right now the little things such as working and go to school lead me to that I am picturing the results of that. When I can finally graduate college and get a degree. I am able to work my dream job making money and providing for my son. I always dream of those days and cannot wait until they happen. That is the motivation I need and will always see to keep me going with school and my job. I am classified as an extroverted feeler. Where I can be working or discussing something going on at work and get interrupted. I will pause on what I was discussing with the first person to then help the second person. Once they are taken care of and have what they need I go back to the first person to finish what we was working on or discussing. I like toShow MoreRelatedCategorizing Personality Types Essay1659 Words   |  7 Pagesare ways in which people identify the others surrounding them every day. These personality indicators may seem easy to distinguish; however, at times, finding one’s own personality type can be difficult. In the early 1900s, a Swedish psychologist named Carl Jung introduced the idea of categorizing personalities into identifiable types (Boeree). By investigating the subconscious, Jung was able to classify personality types that have certain characteristics in common. This became known as typologyRead MoreThe, New International Version Essay1790 Words   |  8 Pagesnuances which make us who we are. Though I believe my personality traits have changed over the years, with maturity, I find myself to reflecting on various scenarios realizing that if I only knew this information sooner, the situation could have had a completely different outcome. â€Æ' God Made Me Special â€Å"For you created my inmost being; you knit me together in my mother’s womb. I praise you because I am fearfully and wonderfully made; your works are wonderful, I know that full well.† (Psalm 139:13-14Read MoreStephen P. Robbins Timothy A. Judge (2011) Organizational Behaviour 15th Edition New Jersey: Prentice Hall393164 Words   |  1573 Pages978-0-13-283487-2 ISBN-10: 0-13-283487-1 1. Organizational behavior. I. Judge, Tim. II. Title. HD58.7.R62 2012 658.3—dc23 2011038674 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 ISBN 10: 0-13-283487-1 ISBN 13: 978-0-13-283487-2 Brief Contents Preface xxii 1 2 Introduction 1 What Is Organizational Behavior? 3 The Individual 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Diversity in Organizations 39 Attitudes and Job Satisfaction 69 Emotions and Moods 97 Personality and Values 131 Perception and Individual Decision Making 165 Motivation